Winter Courses | Rutgers University

503 Topics in Public Administration: Public Charities Dominican Republic

Topics in Public Administration: Public Charities Dominican Republic (20:834:503:W1:00081)
Class Dates: 1/4/20 - 1/11/20
Class Times: Meeting Time By Arrangement
Instructor: Staff
Format: By Arrangement
Credits: 3
COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Course will meet 1/4/20-1/11/20

Open to Major/Unit: 20

105 Intermediate Algebra

Intermediate Algebra (21:640:105:W1:13290)
Class Dates: 12/23/2019 - 1/17/2020
Class Times: MTWThF, 9:00am - 12:15pm
Instructor: Patel, D
Location: Hill Hall - Room 215
Format: On Campus
Credits: 3
COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Intended to give students the necessary numerical and algebraic skills to allow for success in subsequent courses requiring a solid foundation in quantitative reasoning. The topics contained in this course include numerical systems such as the integers and the rational numbers (fractions), variable expressions, equations and applications, graphing simple equations, polynomials, and factoring.

Only for students who previous earned a 'D', 'F', or 'W'.  Email math.cs@rutgers.edu for SPN.

466 Topics in Criminal Justice: Terrorism

Topics in Criminal Justice: Terrorism (47:202:466:W1:13245)
Class Dates: 12/23/2019 - 1/17/2020
Class Times: MTWThF, 1:00pm - 4:15pm
Instructor: Eldivan
Location: Center for Law & Justice - Room 025 & Blackboard
Format: Hybrid
Credits: 3
COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This essential course is a clear and comprehensive introduction to the complex issues surrounding terrorism, perhaps the most pressing major issue facing social sciences (criminal justice, global affairs, law, etc.,) professionals in the 21st century. Students will learn to think critically about the causes of terrorism, both domestic and international. No subject is off limits. Terrorism is intended to be a matter of perception and is thus seen differently by different observers. The failure of unity on the definition leads to the necessity of understanding terrorism in its specific context as, “it erupts and flourishes in different places at different times due to an often particular combination of factors”. Students are encouraged to contemplate and understand the various religious, ideological, nationalistic and ethnic terrorist movements taking place around the world, their origins, their outlook, their aims. Subjects examined in this exciting and fast-paced course include: suicide bombings, the specter of nuclear, biological and chemical terrorism, cyber-terrorism, Jihadism, the new economy of terrorism, and the organization, function and bureaucracy of institutions (governmental or private) which are continuously evolving to counter the increasing threat of terrorism. The student is challenged to come to grips with the reality of terrorism and to be prepared to confront it in any field. 

Course meets online Thursday's and Friday's.

Will meet on campus 12/23, 1/6, 1/7, 1/8, 1/13, 1/14 and 1/15.

466 Topics in Criminal Justice: Media & Crime

Topics in Criminal Justice: Media & Crime (47:202:466:W6:DU:13247)
Class Dates: 12/23/2019 - 1/17/2020
Class Times: MTWThF, 5:30pm - 8:45pm
Instructor: Adubato
Location: Engelhard Hall - Room 209 & Blackboard
Format: Hybrid
Credits: 3
COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course provides insight into the intersection of media and crime and the subsequent influence this has on public policy.  Every citizen, every day, has contact with the media in some form.  Newspapers, advertising, television, etc. all have an impact on our lives.  The list of media forms has grown rapidly—in addition to more traditional sources of media, we now rely on websites, social network sites, and blogs.  

From the beginning of this “American experiment,” crime and criminal justice have held a prominent place in media.  Today, this focus on crime and entertainment that centers on crime is widespread.  This explains why people who rely on media for their information about crime and criminal justice often hold misconceptions about the nature of crime, criminal justice practices, and criminals themselves.  It is imperative that future practitioners in the field of criminal justice come to an understanding of this phenomenon.  

Because much of public policy stems from reaction to voters’ opinions, how voters form these opinions matters greatly.  If there are minor or gross misconceptions surrounding the criminal justice system and voters galvanize what we refer to as “living room policy-making,” the results can be ineffective, irresponsible, or injurious.

Course meets online Thursday's and Friday's.

Will meet on campus 12/23, 1/6, 1/7, 1/8, 1/13, 1/14 and 1/15.

212 Contemporary American Literature: Stephen King: Master Storyteller

Contemporary American Literature: Stephen King: Master Storyteller (21:352:212:W1:13286) CANCELLED
Class Dates: 12/23/2019 - 1/17/2020
Class Times: MTWThF, 9:00am - 12:15pm
Instructor: Yemini
Location: Hill Hall - Room 217
Format: On Campus
Credits: 3
COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course seeks to examine the complex dynamics of narrative by focusing on the literary contributions of the well-renowned author Stephen King.  Students will study King’s work through the lenses of three genres: drama, horror, and science fiction. Thirteen of King’s stories serve as the infrastructural basis for study; film adaptations provide supplementary opportunities for exploration. Students will also engage with King’s memoir, On Writing, to place texts and films in context.  Emphasis is placed on the development of close-reading strategies and critical analysis, as well as the composition of nuanced, convincing, and precise arguments based in textual evidence. In particular, students will practice placing texts in conversation with one another. Ultimately, as students familiarize themselves with a broad array of King’s work—and as they explore the narrative strategies within each text—they will simultaneously identify the artistic and sociocultural components of storytelling. 

481 Senior Seminar I

Senior Seminar I (47:204:481:W1:00235) CANCELLED
Class Dates: 12/23/2019 - 1/17/2020
Class Times: Meeting Time By Arrangement
Instructor: Staff
Format: By Arrangement
Credits: 3
COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Course Description Coming Soon.

499 Special Topics in Social Work: India Travel Course

Special Topics in Social Work: India Travel Course (21:910:499:W1:RK:13249) CANCELLED
Class Dates: 12/23/2019 - 1/17/2020
Class Times: W, 9:00am - 12:15pm
Instructor: Walton
Location: Hill Hall - Room 104
Format: On Campus
Credits: 3
COURSE DESCRIPTION:

India allows students to critically examine the inner workings of a unique group of urban public organizations striving for social change. Participants have an opportunity to engage non-profit leaders, stakeholders, and members of the communities they serve. One of the primary goals of this initiative is to explore various forms of grassroots community leadership within India with the intent of understanding how communities can effectively create programs that address their needs.

Course Travel Fee: $5,000 (Includes flights, accommadations, and 3 meals a day. Excludes course credit cost.) Additional Travel Grants Available.

Dates: Early January - Mid January (Approximate dates TBA)

Application Link: Click Here

Application Deadline: Sunday, October 20, 2019

Office of Global Initiatives & Experiential Learning Registration Form Link: Click Here

105 The Pursuit of Justice

Pursuit of Justice (47:204:105:W1:13202)
Class Dates: 12/23/2019 - 1/17/2020
Class Times: MTWThF, 1:00pm - 4:15pm
Instructor: Pratt
Location: Center for Law & Justice - Room 292 & Blackboard
Format: Hybrid
Credits: 3
COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course surveys philosophies and strategies regarding structures of justice. The class begins with a review of the differences between retributive and distributive justice and how they are related. This analysis leads to a broader discussion of "what justice means," both historically and in contemporary thinking. Students are encouraged to craft their own ideas about justice in social relations and in response to the law. Required course for bachelor of arts.

Course meets online Thursday's and Friday's.

Will meet on campus 12/23, 1/6, 1/7, 1/8, 1/13, 1/14 and 1/15.

342 CONTEMPORARY POLICING

Contemporary Policing (47:202:342:WQ:13204)
Class Dates: 12/23/2019 - 1/17/2020
Class Times: MTWThF, 5:30pm - 8:45pm
Instructor: Minteh
Location: Center for Law & Justice - Room 025 & Blackboard
Format: Hybrid
Credits: 3
COURSE DESCRIPTION:

This course covers various topics that are considered to be critical law enforcement problems. Specific areas of inquiry include how to police organized crime, alcohol and drugs, the policing of civil and natural disturbances, and the diffusion and multiplicity of police agencies. Discussion of issues within crime reporting by the police, assessment difficulties, and public reactions to law enforcement and order maintenance strategies used by the police are covered in this course. Administrative problems of staffing, supervision, employee morale and militancy, and public charges are also critically discussed. 

Writing Intensive.

Course meets online Thursday's and Friday's.

Will meet on campus 12/23, 1/6, 1/7, 1/8, 1/13, 1/14 and 1/15.

486 Tropical Field Biology

Tropical Field Biology (21:120:486:WQ:13191)
Class Dates: 12/23/2019 - 1/17/2020
Class Times: Meeting Time By Arrangement
Instructor: Ruane & Ware
Format: By Arrangement
Credits: 2
COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Permission from the instructor only.  Passport required.  Additional fees for trip are to be determined. Writing Instensive.

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